Archive | June, 2015

Book Review: The Girls at the Kingfisher Club by Genevieve Valentine (4/5)

11 Jun

My good friend Katherine loves fairy tales. She reads them, writes them: everything you can imagine about fairy tales that an MFA candidate would do, she does with fairy tales. She’s enjoyed a lot of fairy tale retellings lately and this one takes place in the 1920s so she was pretty sure I would enjoy it. And she was darn right.

Cover Image via Goodreads.com

Cover Image via Goodreads.com

The Girls at the Kingfisher Club by Genevieve Valentine

Summary from Goodreads:

Jo, the firstborn, “The General” to her eleven sisters, is the only thing the Hamilton girls have in place of a mother. She is the one who taught them how to dance, the one who gives the signal each night, as they slip out of the confines of their father’s townhouse to await the cabs that will take them to the speakeasy. Together they elude their distant and controlling father, until the day he decides to marry them all off.

The girls, meanwhile, continue to dance, from Salon Renaud to the Swan and, finally, the Kingfisher, the club they come to call home. They dance until one night when they are caught in a raid, separated, and Jo is thrust face-to-face with someone from her past: a bootlegger named Tom whom she hasn’t seen in almost ten years. Suddenly Jo must weigh in the balance not only the demands of her father and eleven sisters, but those she must make of herself.

Everything I’ve read about New York City in the 1920s makes me want to live there. The high fashion, the dance clubs, and the woman’s rights movement at the times combine perfectly for a retelling of the Twelve Dancing Princesses. I thought Valentine brought the setting and characters to life well. Each girl had her own quirk and personality and while I couldn’t name them all for you, I never got them confused. The only criticism I have is that the first part of the book seemed really loosely bound to a timeline. It skipped around the girls going out for the fist time, trying new clubs, etc. Only once the Kingfisher was raided did it pick up a consistent timeline. I enjoyed it from then on, but it was two hours into an eight-hour story. I also think the description above gives you more than half the book, which is a bit more than you normally see in a description. Maybe don’t read it?

Jo was a great protagonist. She had a very strong personality and her maternal instincts were admirable. I believed each of the sisters as her own character, especially Lou and Ella. I thought their father was a bit hard to believe, but it was a fairy tale so some beliefs had to be suspended. The idea that he could have 12 daughters and be supporting them while interacted with no one, not even some servants, was unbelievable. Whatever he did, he was around the house a lot to be able to stop them from leaving in the middle of the day yet he was somehow very rich. I got the impression he was involved in some bootlegging, but Prohibition was established in 1920 and the crash of ’29 didn’t seem to have come yet. If they’d been dancing for around 10 years, he had to have money from somewhere else before he started bootlegging. OK, time to stop with my 1920s history now. Getting off the soapbox.

Though I liked Jo, Tom was my favorite character. He never pretended to be something he wasn’t and he was very giving. The first time he’s in the modern timeline, he’s helping Jo out of a tough spot, no questions asked. Without spoiling the ending, he does something for Jo that’s completely selfless and puts someone between them that they both care about very much, all at Jo’s insistence. He’s the kind of friend and partner I would want in any situation. On top of everything, he’s smart.

I think I related most to Jo. I only have one younger brother and have never been locked in the upper floors of my father’s house, but I led a group of 50 while in college. Trying to keep people from fighting and in step with the rules can be a challenge and I think I handled my group much like Jo. I was a bit of a militant, but only when we needed to be safe. She had a good leadership style that I appreciated.

Genevieve Valentine Image via the Author's Website

Genevieve Valentine
Image via the Author’s Website

I loved the ending. I’m going to talk about it here so if you haven’t read the book, skip this paragraph. I was glad that the story arc was finished when Lou came back and not when the younger twins were found or when their father died. It was a very fitting ending wich made me so happy. I was worried it would end sooner.

The beginning of the book was too muddled for me and it gave me a bad impression of the book. Later it was reversed, but it wasn’t the best place to start. It gave me the impression that there wasn’t much of a plot. I was worried about this being a cohesive story, but I was counting on that description to give me a plot.

The audiobook I listened to was narrated by Susie Berneis and I thought she did a good job. It was nothing outstanding, but she did a good job with voices, especially the father. He’s the only one who stands out to me as having a unique voice but with so many female characters, I’m not surprised.

The biggest lesson I got from this book was about family. A lot of books lately have dealt with the strength of non-traditional families and I like this message. Jo was a mother figure to all her sisters, even Lou, in the space their absent mother left. These were girls with no father and no one to raise them. To be honest, I’m wondering how they learned to read. But as soon as one of them learned, Jo would have been sure everyone else learned the same thing.

Writer’s Takeaway: This book had to walk a thin line between mystical and realistic. Of course, it’s a fairy tale retelling, but at the same time it’s giving a very concrete setting of New York City, a very tangible place. I think the beginning of the book was more mystical and the ending more concrete. I would have liked if these were blended more.

Entertaining and a great setting. Four out of Five stars.

Until next time, write on.

You can follow me on GoodreadsFacebookTwitterPinterest, and Instagram. I’m available via email at SamAStevensWriter@gmail.com. And as always, feel free to leave a comment!

Related Posts:
The Girls at the Kingfisher Club by Genevieve Valentine | Intellectus Speculativus
The Girls at the Kingfisher Club, by Genevieve Valentine | Inspiration Struck
“I like boats.” – The Girls at the Kingfisher Club by Genevieve Valentine | Lady Business

Advertisements

WWW Wednesday, 10-June-2015

10 Jun

Welcome to WWW Wednesday! This meme was formerly hosted by MizB at Should be Reading and revived here on Taking on a World of Words. Just answer the three questions below and leave a link to your post in the comments for others to look at. No blog? No problem! Just leave a comment with your responses. Please, take some time to visit the other participants and see what others are reading. So, let’s get to it!

IMG_1384-0

The Three Ws are:

What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?


SombraCurrently reading:  I’m getting through La Sombra del Viento by Carlos Ruiz Zafon. I’ve been focusing on this as my main book but I think I’m getting a new book club selection tonight so that might change soon.
Good progress with A Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin. People are dying and things are getting crazy so I wonder if I’m close to the end? Rob’s put together an army and I think this battle is going to be slightly climactic. I wish these PlayAway MP3s made it easier to figure out where I am in the story!
Slow progress with Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell. I finished part 1 and I was hoping part 2 would catch my attention more but no luck so far. I’ll carry on slowly.
I’m enjoying my phone audiobook, Harry, a History by Melissa Anelli so far. Reviews I’ve read say that this is more of her story with Harry and not so much a history of the series so I’ll see what I think.

Recently finished: Nope, nothing new this week. Oh well. The up and down of finishing books continues. And no reviews this past week. I’m really letting you guys down…

WidowReading Next: Still planning on it being A Widow for One Year by John Irving. I want to sink my teeth into this soon because I’m itching to read it, but I’m not sure it will come my way at a good time.


Leave a comment with your link and a comment (if you’re so inclined). Take a look at the other participant links in the comments and look at what others are reading.

Have any opinions on these choices?

Until next time, write on.

You can follow me on GoodreadsFacebookTwitterPinterest, and Instagram. I’m available via email at SamAStevensWriter@gmail.com. And as always, feel free to leave a comment!

Library Writer’s Group: Plotting

9 Jun

After two months leaderless, our writing group leader has returned! She’s still subbing at the library and they agreed to let her use her sub hours on our group. Yay! So welcome back, Amy!

We met a few weeks ago and talked about plotting. We read an article by Courtney Carpenter that outlined the key elements of a story concept. She took the approach from Todd A. Stone’s book Novelist’s Boot Camp. It argues that the idea for a story starts from a basic situation and then asking What if? What if it rained? What if she died? What if the government was different? But then that idea has to be settled into a solid concept. And that concept needs to consist of four items.

  1. Genre
  2. Main Character
  3. Opposition
  4. Macro setting

This gives you a short concept, an elevator pitch, for your novel.

We talked about some other techniques, specifically the snowflake method as popularized by Randy Ingermanson. If you want to look him up, he has a very detailed website. Here are the basics of the snowflake method.

  1. Write a one sentence synopsis, similar to that described above.
  2. Write a five sentence, one paragraph synopsis.
  3. Develop your major characters
  4. Write a five paragraph summary
  5. Re-work characters and develop secondary characters
  6. Write a four-page synopsis

And it goes on from there. Your sentence grows into a novel.

Another guide to plotting we talked about was KM Weiland. She has a website at Helping Writers Become Authors. She reviews how to outline and structure novels on her site.

There are some writers who don’t like to outline and like to ‘pants’ their way through a novel. I am personally not one of them though I’m trying to see how it goes. My only issue with pantsing is that some writers feel that they’ve written a book in its totality after the first time through. I’m not sure its even possible to write a complete story the first time through, outline or no. Revisions are part of writing. There are novels where you can tell the author made up the plot as he or she went along and I can name some examples I’ve read, but will refrain here. I want to reiterate that my opinion is that everything needs to be revised. This involves plot and grammar. None of us is perfect and things can always be better. I don’t think my stories are better than someone who doesn’t use an outline. We will both have to revise.

At the end of our meeting, we went over some basic comma usage. It’s always good to brush up on grammar so editors aren’t pulling their hair out and thinking that writers are a bunch of idiots.

I’m excited to continue with this group. It’s been really wonderful.

Until next time, write on.

You can follow me on Goodreads, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram. I’m available via email at SamAStevensWriter@gmail.com. And as always, feel free to leave a comment!

Book to Film: A Scanner Darkly by Philip K. Dick

8 Jun
Movie poster via the Imp Awards

Movie poster via the Imp Awards

I recently read A Scanner Darkly and then had a mini book club talk about it with my husband and a friend. I liked it a bit, but I wasn’t crazy about it. Of course. this was followed by seeing the movie!

Things I Thought Were Awesome

Animation overlay. I watched the special effects documentary at the end so I know what a pain this was for the animators, but I think it was worth it. Being able to see the scramble suits was awesome and I’m not sure how that could have been done with live action. But on top of that, it gave us the sense of Bob imagining things and seeing them change that isn’t possible with live action. There’s no way to turn one woman’s face into another or morph a friend into a giant insect seamlessly. The animation made it all work.

Robert Downey Jr. I had a hard time imaging Barris’ personality or mannerisms when reading the book. How is this person both cocky and right all the time and so incredibly drugged out? Well, he’s basically Iron Man on drugs or Robert Downey Jr. The casting was genius and Downey did a great job.

Changes That Didn’t Really Bother Me

Seeing Feck at New Path. In the book, there wasn’t a lot of closure around if Feck successfully killed himself or sort of disappeared from the narrative. Seeing him at the rehab center gave his character more closure than he had in the book.

Things That Were Taken Out and I’m Still Wondering Why

Bob’s decline. The book showed stages of decline as Bob’s quick decline became worse. Fred didn’t realize he was Bob or wouldn’t realize why Bob was doing something even though the same physical person was doing the things. The movie accelerated this decline to a point where it didn’t seem believable. He went from coherent to passing out in a day. There was no in between.

The German. Somewhat related to the above point, the missing interrupting German was a big change from the book. Adding in thoughts in a different language made it obvious that Bob was losing his grasp of reality and though this phenomenon was mentioned in the movie, Bob never experienced it.

Things That Changed Too Much

The Hank Reveal. I’m actually mad about this one. During my book club discussion, my husband said he thought Donna was Hank and we all had a big moment of, “OH MY GOSH!” We thought we’d figured out the whole book and were so smart. And then we saw the movie and they took our genius moment and made it part of the plot. Did we miss something and this was in the book, or did the screenwriters add it because they had the same idea as us? I’m a bit peeved.

Barris coming to the cops at the beginning. I think this changed how you looked at Barris all along. Instead of looking at him like a crazy person who was suspicious of Bob, you looked at him as someone to be suspicious of from the get-go. I didn’t like this view of him.

Overall Reactions

Artistically beautiful and much of the plot was well maintained. The characters were well brought to life and the story was very vivid. It was a good movie adaptation.

To anyone else who has seen or read this, what did I miss? Anything you would add to my lists?

Until next time, write on.

You can follow me on Goodreads, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram. I’m available via email at SamAStevensWriter@gmail.com. And as always, feel free to leave a comment!

Book Club Reflection: The Inner Circle by Brad Meltzer

4 Jun

Brad Meltzer’s book The Inner Circle was chosen as the ‘Everyone’s Reading’ selection for 2015. This is a program the libraries in my area work to put together that usually culminates in the author coming to speak in the area. Previously, it was Chris Bohjalian. This year, Meltzer will be speaking in the area on June 22nd. But before he comes to speak, my book clubs usually read one or more of his books. Unfortunately, the meeting for The Inner Circle was moved forward a week and attendance suffered. We’re not sure if it was because of the book or the changed date, but the meeting was only me and one other woman. So here are our musings.

There were questions posted by the local libraries that helped our discussion, but we didn’t find that this genre led to a lot of discussion. It’s entertaining for sure, but not particularly thought-provoking.

The other woman at our discussion did some research on Meltzer. He said that Mr. Rodgers (the television personality) thought him that each person is special and not to let anyone tell him no when he set his mind to something. He also said that the teacher who told him he could write well is his hero. As the wife of an English teacher, this makes me happy.

Meltzer is called to Washington regularly to advise on potential terrorist threats and how the US can prepare itself to fight these. This is where he got his idea to write political thrillers. This book, in particular, was inspired by something George W. Bush whispered in his ear about how hard it is to keep secrets in the White House.

He says that his books have a recurring theme of the fallout from daily choices. We didn’t really see that in this book. Beecher was pressured into covering up the book, it wasn’t a daily choice. He chooses to meet Clementine, but that seemed like a coercion by the end of the book as well. I don’t think this theme was well brought out.

I’ve been to DC before and I never would have thought to go to the Archives to look up anything for myself. I saw the Constitution and called it a day. It sounds fun, but I’m not sure what I would look up!

One of the style choices Meltzer utilized was switching between present and past tense. Chapters narrated by Beecher were written in present tense while those narrated by other characters were in the past tense. I didn’t consciously notice this while reading, but I did feel it was jerky to switch between narrators and I believe this could be the reason. My fellow book-clubber didn’t notice the switches. She listened to the book on audio while following along in a physical copy and wonders if that might have been part of the reason.

We both liked the short chapter style. We think it helped us read the book faster because we got into the ‘One more chapter’ mode. I liked having a lot of places to stop that weren’t in the middle of a chapter.

We both liked Clementine when she was introduced. We believed her story and wanted her to find some closure and happiness. When she turned into a bad character, we were really disappointed. I felt really manipulated by her. At that point in the book, everything was turning out to be ‘not how it first seemed’ and, to be honest, I was getting a bit sick of it. Clementine was the icing on the cake.

We were surprised Tot ended up being a good guy. He seemed a bit suspect at times and I didn’t like that Beecher decided not to trust him when he was told by someone he didn’t necessarily trust to stop talking to him. I don’t see Tot being a major character in the remaining books, but I’m glad he was a part of this one.

It was hard to know what to think of Dallas. He seemed like a slimy character but in the end, we felt sorry for him. It was almost comical that he’d had the wool pulled over his eyes by the President’s inner circle to think he was part of the Culper Ring. I wanted to feel sorry for him because he did seem to have good intentions, but his ignorance made me think he was stupid. I’m still kind of indifferent to him.

Beecher was a hard protagonist to like. He acted very stupidly at times for someone who was also very intelligent. He was sucked in by a beautiful woman quickly. He trusted everyone to a fault. Our questions asked us if he reminded us of Indiana Jones. We didn’t feel that way because Indy was very action-oriented in how he solved historical mysteries while Beecher’s plot was advanced more intellectually. He reminded me more of Dan Brown’s Robert Langdon from the Angles and Demons series.

This is the first book in a series so we speculated what would happen in the sequels (I have the second but don’t know how long it will be until I read it). How will Beecher and the Culper Ring find Clementine in Canada and what would they do when they find her? We think that would be the bulk of the story, but I’m not really interested in that story. I’m more interested in Minnie because I disliked her. I don’t know how involved the President will be in future novels because he doesn’t have a secret, only his sister does. But he seems determined to protect it. The other woman who joined me said that this reminds her of the TV series Scandal which I’ve never seen. She says there’s a big secret with his wife and father and the no-good things they get up to.

Hopefully, more people show up to our next meeting. I like discussing with a group more!

Until next time, write on.

You can follow me on Goodreads, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram. I’m available via email at SamAStevensWriter@gmail.com. And as always, feel free to leave a comment!

WWW Wednesday, 3-June-2015

3 Jun

Welcome to WWW Wednesday! This meme was formerly hosted by MizB at Should be Reading and revived here on Taking on a World of Words. Just answer the three questions below and leave a link to your post in the comments for others to look at. No blog? No problem! Just leave a comment with your responses. Please, take some time to visit the other participants and see what others are reading. So, let’s get to it!

IMG_1384-0

The Three Ws are:

What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?


HarryCurrently reading:  I’ve been working on La Sombra del Viento by Carlos Ruiz Zafon. It’s reminding me that I need to practice my Spanish more, but I’m really enjoying the story. I hope to finish it this summer.
Good progress with A Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin. I think I’m finally getting somewhere with it and I’m liking it a lot more than I thought I would.
Slow progress with Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell. I’m not engaged yet and I’m not sure how long it will take, but it’s a good morning read so far.
I’ve started a new audiobook on my phone which is Harry, a History by Melissa Anelli. It’s an oral history of the Harry Potter phenomenon as told by a leading fangirl. Not too far into it yet to judge, but I’ll be sure to report out soon.

KingfisherRecently finished: I got through two! The first was The Girls at the Kingfisher Club by Genevieve Valentine which was an audiobook for me. I enjoyed it and gave it 4/5 stars. Review coming next week.
The second was The Bohemians by Ben Tarnoff. It just wasn’t for me, unfortunately. I wasn’t really interested in the subject and I felt the narrative jumped around a lot so I wasn’t as interested as I would have liked to be. Oh well. 2/5 stars.

I’ve also got two book reviews posted since last week. Go check out my feelings on Waiting to be Heard by Amanda Knox and The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman.

WidowReading Next: Still planning on it being A Widow for One Year by John Irving. This will be the next book to derail me from Sombra and, to be honest, I won’t mind.


Leave a comment with your link and a comment (if you’re so inclined). Take a look at the other participant links in the comments and look at what others are reading.

Have any opinions on these choices?

Until next time, write on.

You can follow me on GoodreadsFacebookTwitterPinterest, and Instagram. I’m available via email at SamAStevensWriter@gmail.com. And as always, feel free to leave a comment!

Challenge Update, May 2015

2 Jun

I’m continuing with good progress this month, thankfully. I was worried about my cyclical movements so far this year, but now I’m doing better. You can look at my progress at any time on my challenge page.

Books finished in May:

Left Behind by Tim LaHaye and Jerry B. Jenkins (3)
The Inner Circle by Brad Meltzer (3)
Waiting to be Heard by Amanda Knox (4)
The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman (4)
The Girls at the Kingfisher Club by Genevieve Valentine (4)
The Bohemians by Ben Tarnoff (2)

And reviews for all! I’m most proud of that. I’ve been doing well at staying up to date on my reviews.

When Are You Reading? Challenge

8/13
This is my challenge to read a book from 13 different time periods. You can read about it here. My timeline will track all of my books and show which time period they fall into. I’ve knocked off one new period this month, 1800s with The Bohemians. I have a plan for the five remaining and I’m excited to say I think I’ll finish well ahead of time this year.

Goodreads Challenge

22/50

Now two books ahead of schedule! I didn’t think I’d keep that pace up, but I’ve been doing well. Even with the slow down of listening to A Game of Thrones on audio, I think I can keep up my pace.

Book of the Month

I thought it would be fun to pick my favorite book for each month reading and feature it. For May, I’m going to pick Waiting to be Heard by Amanda Knox. I was so engrossed in this story and it read fast. I recommend it!

How are your challenges going? I hope you’re doing better than me! If you love historical fiction, give some thought to my challenge, it’s fun!

Until next time, write on.

You can follow me on GoodreadsFacebookTwitterPinterest, and Instagram. I’m available via email at SamAStevensWriter@gmail.com. And as always, feel free to leave a comment!

Book Review: The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman (4/5)

1 Jun

As much as I hear about Neil Gaiman and how much everyone loves him, I’ve never read any of his solo books. I read Good Omens, which he co-wrote with the late Terry Pratchett, but never any solo work. Once again, book clubs come to save the day with pushing me outside my comfort zone. Yay, book clubs!

Cover Image via Goodreads.com

Cover Image via Goodreads.com

The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman

Summary from Goodreads:

Sussex, England. A middle-aged man returns to his childhood home to attend a funeral. Although the house he lived in is long gone, he is drawn to the farm at the end of the road, where, when he was seven, he encountered a most remarkable girl, Lettie Hempstock, and her mother and grandmother. He hasn’t thought of Lettie in decades, and yet as he sits by the pond (a pond that she’d claimed was an ocean) behind the ramshackle old farmhouse, the unremembered past comes flooding back. And it is a past too strange, too frightening, too dangerous to have happened to anyone, let alone a small boy.

Forty years earlier, a man committed suicide in a stolen car at this farm at the end of the road. Like a fuse on a firework, his death lit a touchpaper and resonated in unimaginable ways. The darkness was unleashed, something scary and thoroughly incomprehensible to a little boy. And Lettie—magical, comforting, wise beyond her years—promised to protect him, no matter what.

I didn’t know what to think of this book. It was good, I enjoyed it, but it was so short and so fantastical that I never got into it completely. I understand why this book is targeted at adults, but the content felt overly juvenile at times. I liked remembering what it was like to be a child and believe what you are told and trust things you cannot see. I liked the characters. I just never connected with them.

It’s hard to comment on the characters credibility because half of them were under a spell, and the other half were fantastical beings of otherworldly power. Old Mrs. Hempstock reminded me of my grandmother and made me so happy to read about. Lettie was the cool friend we all wanted to have, and Ursula was the evil babysitter everyone remembered. But there was a thread of magic to all of them that made them just unbelievable enough to not seem human.

Lettie was an obvious favorite. I loved her sly comments or refusals to answer some questions and her vast knowledge. Even though she was aged well beyond her 11 years, she was still a child in maturity to her mother and grandmother. She was caring when she didn’t have to be, especially to our un-named narrator. I would have loved to be her friend.

As is the case with a lot of fantasy works, I had trouble relating to the characters only because their lives are so different from my own. I’ve never had to use magic to trick my parents or had an evil worm in my foot or been stalked by hungry shadow birds. I can’t relate to this. What I can relate to is the feeling a child has that what’s going on around him seems magical and unbelievable and that it’s impossible to explain it to an adult. Adults aren’t ready to open their minds as readily to things that can’t be explained. I liked that Gaiman brought back this memory.

Neil Gaiman Image via the Huffington Post

Neil Gaiman
Image via the Huffington Post

I liked the scenes with Ursula. She was a great antagonist and embodied everything children remember hating about babysitters and adults. I liked the narrator’s reactions to her and that she was so evil in her manipulation that she was easy to hate.

I didn’t like the first time the narrator went to the Hempstock farm. There was a lot that wasn’t explained, and it frustrated me as a reader not to understand what was going on. I would have asked more questions than the narrator did because I’m not as trusting as a child.

Gaiman wants adults to remember what it’s like to be a child; to be trusting and confused and scared and innocent. It’s hard for adults to remember what this is like. I didn’t remember it well, but Gaiman’s book gave me a bit of a memory. I wonder how he’s able to remember childhood so vividly.

Writer’s Takeaway: As a writer, you are responsible to set a scene for your readers; something so intense they can believe they’re there. Suggestions I’ve heard include involving all five senses. That is much easier said than done. But Gaiman does it wonderfully. He speaks at length about the incredible food the Hempstocks cook, which helps with taste and smell. I could taste and smell the pancakes, and it helped bring the setting to life. I liked that he utilized this trick because it brought me more into the book.

Enjoyable and fun, but not the genre for me. Four out of Five stars.

Until net time, write on.

You can follow me on GoodreadsFacebookTwitterPinterest, and Instagram. I’m available via email at SamAStevensWriter@gmail.com. And as always, feel free to leave a comment!

Related Posts:
Review – Neil Gaiman’s The Ocean at the End of the Lane | The Blog was Better
The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman | Vulpes Libris
Meeting Neil Gaiman | Geek Madel