Archive | May, 2021

WWW Wednesday, 26-May-2021

26 May

Welcome to WWW Wednesday! This meme was formerly hosted by MizB at A Daily Rhythm and revived here on Taking on a World of Words. Just answer the three questions below and leave a link to your post in the comments for others to look at. No blog? No problem! Just leave a comment with your responses. Please, take some time to visit the other participants and see what others are reading. So, let’s get to it!IMG_1384-0

The Three Ws are:

What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

Note: For users of Blogspot blogs, I’m unable to comment on your posts as a WordPress blogger unless you’ve enabled Name/URL comments. This is a known WordPress/Blogspot issue. Please consider enabling this to participate more fully in the community. 


HangmanCurrently reading: I did get through a chapter of Lateral Thinking by Edward de Bono this week so we’re back on the train with this one. I think it will go quickly if I can keep to a chapter per week, but that’s proving harder than I thought it would.
I’m still dragging through The Hangman’s Replacement: Sprout of Disruption by Taona Dumisani Chiveneko. The disjointed story is still hard for me to get into. I think it’s going to start coming together soon, or at least I really hope it does so I don’t lose interest.
I’ve just about finished The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead so expect this to be reviewed next week. I need the satisfaction of finishing something!

Recently finished: Hopefully, something will be on this list next week.

MoscowReading next: The plan is still to read Dollface by Renee Rosen once I finish de Bono. I hope that’s soon.
Reading buddy and I picked our next book and it’s going to be A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles. My copy got here on Monday and I’m really excited to get started with it! I loved the other Towles book I read a few years ago so I think this will be a fun one.

Leave a comment with your link and comment (if you’re so inclined). Take a look at the other participant links in the comments and look at what others are reading.

Have any opinions on these choices?

Until next time, write on.

You can follow me on GoodreadsFacebookTwitterPinterest, and Instagram. I’m available via email at SamAStevensWriter@gmail.com. And as always, feel free to leave a comment!

Some of the links on this post may be affiliate links. Taking on a World of Words is a participant in affiliate programs designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by linking to products. If you purchase a product or service through an affiliate link, your cost will be the same but Sam will automatically receive a small commission. Your support is greatly appreciated.

WWW Wednesday, 19-May-2021

19 May

Welcome to WWW Wednesday! This meme was formerly hosted by MizB at A Daily Rhythm and revived here on Taking on a World of Words. Just answer the three questions below and leave a link to your post in the comments for others to look at. No blog? No problem! Just leave a comment with your responses. Please, take some time to visit the other participants and see what others are reading. So, let’s get to it!IMG_1384-0

The Three Ws are:

What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

Note: For users of Blogspot blogs, I’m unable to comment on your posts as a WordPress blogger unless you’ve enabled Name/URL comments. This is a known WordPress/Blogspot issue. Please consider enabling this to participate more fully in the community. 


LateralCurrently reading: Last week was great, this week is slow. I didn’t even open Lateral Thinking by Edward de Bono so no progress to report there. It will come eventually, right?
I’m going slow through The Hangman’s Replacement: Sprout of Disruption by Taona Dumisani Chiveneko because it’s so disjointed that I have yet to get into it. There are a lot of characters that seem very loosely connected but it feels like short stories instead of a novel so far and I’m getting frustrated.
The book where I’ve made the most progress is The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead. This is a well done audiobook and the book took a turn I wasn’t expecting that sucked me in. Not sure I’ll be done next week but I’ll get through it in good time.

Recently finished: Nothing new this week. I’ll be optimistic that I’ll have something next week, but that seems like a bit of a stretch at this point.

DollfaceReading next: I’m hoping to start Dollface by Renee Rosen as an ebook because I need some 1920s in my life! That period always seems to suck me in.

Leave a comment with your link and comment (if you’re so inclined). Take a look at the other participant links in the comments and look at what others are reading.

Have any opinions on these choices?

Until next time, write on.

You can follow me on GoodreadsFacebookTwitterPinterest, and Instagram. I’m available via email at SamAStevensWriter@gmail.com. And as always, feel free to leave a comment!

Some of the links on this post may be affiliate links. Taking on a World of Words is a participant in affiliate programs designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by linking to products. If you purchase a product or service through an affiliate link, your cost will be the same but Sam will automatically receive a small commission. Your support is greatly appreciated.

Book Club Reflection: Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows by Balli Kaur Jaswal

17 May

My book club met over Zoom to read Balli Kaur Jaswal’s Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows. I’ll be honest and say my book club’s discussion on this book got a little off track really fast and I didn’t get a lot of notes about our meeting. There were a lot of comments I didn’t feel were based on fact and I didn’t feel comfortable recording to report here. There was a lot of discussion about cultural traditions in India surrounding widowhood and marriage but none of us have first-hand experience with this cultural tradition. One reader talked about a documentary she’d watched that she believed was called “The Invisible Widows” and thought it was from the National Geographic. I can’t find this so if anyone has a link, please share it in the comments below; I’d be interested to see what this reader was talking about.

Our moderator told us that this is Jaswal’s third book and that her fourth is out now. The newest is also about British-born Punjabi characters. When picking this book, our moderator was nervous for a moment that it would be considered too racy. She explained her logic by saying that often in our culture, we come across extreme violence and are numb to it. When we come across explicit sexual content, we’re affected. Of these two things, we hope to come across one in our lifetime and not the other, yet the one we hope to find is what affects us. As a society, we may want to reconsider that.

I do not have a sister but the readers who did felt that the relationship between Nikki and Mindy seemed right. It was fitting that they were so hard on each other and that they could be so different having come from the same family. The only other character we discussed was Kulwinder, who is the most dynamic character in the story aside from Nikki. She became more likeable as the book went on. You realized what was happening to her and what had happened to her family and started to pity her. You also see that she’s fighting for women and their independence as much as Nikki wants to. The two are actually very natural allies.

I’m not sure if I’ll be continuing with this book club. Our organizer is moving on to another job and we’re taking off June. I plan to attend in July but with Baby coming in early August, I might take a break and possibly pick up with the book club at new local library. It was going to get tricky when we started meeting in person again and I have a feeling that by the time things with Baby have calmed down, they’ll be back to the bar for meetings. But we shall see.

Until next time, write on.

You can follow me on Goodreads, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram. I’m available via email at SamAStevensWriter@gmail.com. And as always, feel free to leave a comment!

Some of the links on this post may be affiliate links. Taking on a World of Words is a participant in affiliate programs designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by linking to products. If you purchase a product or service through an affiliate link, your cost will be the same but Sam will automatically receive a small commission. Your support is greatly appreciated.

WWW Wednesday, 12-May-2021

12 May

Welcome to WWW Wednesday! This meme was formerly hosted by MizB at A Daily Rhythm and revived here on Taking on a World of Words. Just answer the three questions below and leave a link to your post in the comments for others to look at. No blog? No problem! Just leave a comment with your responses. Please, take some time to visit the other participants and see what others are reading. So, let’s get to it!IMG_1384-0

The Three Ws are:

What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

Note: For users of Blogspot blogs, I’m unable to comment on your posts as a WordPress blogger unless you’ve enabled Name/URL comments. This is a known WordPress/Blogspot issue. Please consider enabling this to participate more fully in the community. 


UndergroundCurrently reading: I think I read a chapter from Lateral Thinking by Edward de Bono this week but that’s about it. I’m not happy about moving so slowly, but I’ll come to terms with it eventually. I’ll finish it, but maybe I want to shy away from nonfiction for this format in the future.
I made some decent progress in The Hangman’s Replacement: Sprout of Disruption by Taona Dumisani Chiveneko. I’m a little iffy on this one right now, it seems to be rambling a bit and I’m unsure how it might all come back together.
I started listening to The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead on Sunday but I’m not far into it yet. It’s a long book so I expect this will be here for a while, though I hope I can power through.

PetticoatsRecently finished: I finished up The Lady’s Guide to Petticoats and Piracy by Mackenzi Lee! After taking a break from it for so long, it was great to finish this one. I posted my review yesterday so you can check that out. I gave the book Four out of Five Stars.
I also finished Recursion by Blake Crouch and I’m meeting with my reading buddy tonight to talk about it. I found the end a bit too convenient, but this is a book I still thoroughly enjoyed and I would recommend to people who liked Crouch’s first book. I gave it Four out of Five Stars.

I also posted my review for Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows by Balli Kaur Jaswal on Thursday last week. My book club met on Monday to discuss it so look for a summary of that conversation early next week.

DollfaceReading next: I still think Dollface by Renee Rosen will be my next ebook. I just need to read ebooks faster so I need a new one!

Leave a comment with your link and comment (if you’re so inclined). Take a look at the other participant links in the comments and look at what others are reading.

Have any opinions on these choices?

Until next time, write on.

You can follow me on GoodreadsFacebookTwitterPinterest, and Instagram. I’m available via email at SamAStevensWriter@gmail.com. And as always, feel free to leave a comment!

Some of the links on this post may be affiliate links. Taking on a World of Words is a participant in affiliate programs designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by linking to products. If you purchase a product or service through an affiliate link, your cost will be the same but Sam will automatically receive a small commission. Your support is greatly appreciated.

Book Review: The Lady’s Guide to Petticoats and Piracy by Mackenzi Lee (4/5)

11 May

I absolutely adored the first book in this series so to say I put it on a pedestal is perhaps an understatement. I was so excited to start it that I didn’t think about book club picks that might get in the way and had to stop three hours in for more than a month to squeeze in some other books before coming back to it. But when I did return, I powered through.

PetticoatsThe Lady’s Guide to Petticoats and Piracy (Montague Siblings #2) by Mackenzi Lee

Other books by Lee reviewed on this blog:

The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue
The Gentleman’s Guide to Getting Lucky

Summary from Amazon:

A year after an accidentally whirlwind grand tour with her brother Monty, Felicity Montague has returned to England with two goals in mind—avoid the marriage proposal of a lovestruck suitor from Edinburgh and enroll in medical school. However, her intellect and passion will never be enough in the eyes of the administrators, who see men as the sole guardians of science.

But then a window of opportunity opens—a doctor she idolizes is marrying an old friend of hers in Germany. Felicity believes if she could meet this man he could change her future, but she has no money of her own to make the trip. Luckily, a mysterious young woman is willing to pay Felicity’s way, so long as she’s allowed to travel with Felicity disguised as her maid.

In spite of her suspicions, Felicity agrees, but once the girl’s true motives are revealed, Felicity becomes part of a perilous quest that leads them from the German countryside to the promenades of Zurich to secrets lurking beneath the Atlantic.

This book was fun and a great adventure, but I was looking for something more and unfortunately didn’t get it. Don’t get me wrong Felicity’s voice is great and Johanna and Sim were amazing companions. However, I didn’t fee like Felicity grew much during the book and Monty’s growth was part of what I loved so much in the first book. Felicity grew more in the first book than she seemed to in this one. It felt a bit more like a forced sequel than a true second plot and I was disappointed. By my rating, you can see I still enjoyed it, but I couldn’t give it the full Five Stars.

I didn’t believe Felicity and Johanna as much as I would have liked. Felicity was so single minded for much of the book that I found it hard to believe she welcomed Johanna back into her life so quickly and abandoned her worship of Platt as fast as she did. The rest of the book, her focus was much more external and it seemed like a sudden shift. Johanna was more likeable the second half of the book but I didn’t understand why she was so subservient before she ran away. She seemed so happy and content and many of the comments she and her uncle made made it seem like she wanted to get married. She never seemed to contradict this later so her decision to abscond baffled me for much of the book.

Sim was my favorite character. I thought her motivation was the strongest out of the female leads. Her relationship with her father was appropriately complicated. I also liked how Lee brought in a Muslim character and the cultural opportunities that opened the book to because of that diverse pick. Sim was a strong a powerful character and I think I’d rather a sequel about her than another Montague sibling at this point.

There wasn’t much relatable about Felicity which is part of why I didn’t engage with her. Her adventure was larger than life and very fun, but it’s not something most of us will even get a chance to experience. Her friendship with Johanna ended poorly and that could have been something I understood and related to, but their resuming of their friendship was almost too quick and they never seemed to sort out what had driven them apart. Her desire to do something society pushed back against has become (thankfully) less relatable for most people. I think this was supposed to be one thing that made her relatable to women but in this case, I think time has made her struggles less common and her drive less relatable.

Lee

Mackenzi Lee Author image via HarperCollins

I enjoyed the time the girls spent in Zurich best. After that, the book started moving so fast that I had some trouble keeping up with it. Zurich gave them time to develop as individuals and to bond as a group which was fun to watch. Felicity was able to show her knowledge and apply it well with Sim’s injury and we got to see how the three could work together for the rest of the book.

Platt’s character was the most disappointing part of the entire book to me. Felicity looked up to him so much and we know that he’s a very intelligent person from the books that he wrote and the work that he did. The way he carved a way for himself in the medical field was admirable. However, he was a wreck once he appeared. His addiction was to blame for a lot of this, but it seemed too much of an oversimplification based on how he’d been built up. I was really hoping for a bit more, for his genius to shine through in some way or for him to at least show his medical knowledge.

The audiobook was narrated by Moira Quirk. I didn’t hate her reading, but it wasn’t my favorite. She made a lot of things sounds flippant that I don’t think should have been read in such flippant tones. It was hard for me to tell if that was the writing or the narration, though. I will say that I liked her dramatic pauses when large turns happened. She had good voices for the characters, though Johanna and Felicity were a bit similar.

Felicity takes her fate into her own hands, not letting her society dictate what she can or should do. She refuses romantic relationships and pursues professional growth. She’s a very modern woman living in the 1700s. The book shows how far women have come since Felicity is very limited by her sex and the time she lives in. Many of the things she is barred from doing are much more easily obtainable by women today. Her fight it what makes this so. We wouldn’t be where we are today without the women who came before us, women like Felicity who pushed back and found their own way.

Writer’s Takeaway: Lee kept a first-person narration story moving forward at a good pace which can be hard to do! Her time jumps were well managed and she kept Felicity at the center of the excitement without it seeming forced out out of character. I’ve tried to write first person and struggled so I was so excited to see a story move so smoothly.

Overall, a fun read but nothing like the first in the series. Four out of Five Stars

This book fulfills the 1700-1799 time period of the When Are You Reading? 2021 Challenge.

Until next time, write on.

You can follow me on GoodreadsFacebookTwitterPinterest, and Instagram. I’m available via email at SamAStevensWriter@gmail.com. And as always, feel free to leave a comment!

Some of the links on this post may be affiliate links. Taking on a World of Words is a participant in affiliate programs designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by linking to products. If you purchase a product or service through an affiliate link, your cost will be the same but Sam will automatically receive a small commission. Your support is greatly appreciated.

Related Posts:
The Lady’s Guide to Petticoats and Piracy by Mackenzi Lee (Montague Siblings #2) | Steeping Stories
The Lady’s Guide to Petticoats and Piracy (Montague Siblings #2) Review | BookLoversBlog
‘The Lady’s Guide To Petticoats and Piracy’ by Mackenzi Lee, 2018. A review by John Cook. | queerreaders
The Lady’s Guide to Petticoats and Piracy by Mackenzi Lee (ARC): A Loveable Girl Gang on an Adventure Saving Sea Monsters | Vicky Who Reads
Book Review | The Lady’s Guide to Petticoats and Piracy – Mackenzi Lee | For the Love of Books

Book Review: Recursion by Blake Crouch (4/5)

10 May

This was for sure my pick for a buddy read. I loved Courch’s first book, Dark Matter. I was curious to see what else he had up his sleeve. My reading buddy was up for a bit of a thriller so this seemed like a good pick for us both. Man, did we speed through this one. I think we met twice in a week at one point because we were both so eager to keep reading.

Recursion

Cover image via Amazon

Recrusion by Blake Crouch

Other books by Crouch reviewed on this blog:

Dark Matter (and Book Club Reflection)

Summary from Amazon:

Reality is broken.
 
At first, it looks like a disease. An epidemic that spreads through no known means, driving its victims mad with memories of a life they never lived. But the force that’s sweeping the world is no pathogen. It’s just the first shock wave, unleashed by a stunning discovery—and what’s in jeopardy is not our minds but the very fabric of time itself.
 
In New York City, Detective Barry Sutton is closing in on the truth—and in a remote laboratory, neuroscientist Helena Smith is unaware that she alone holds the key to this mystery . . . and the tools for fighting back.
 
Together, Barry and Helena will have to confront their enemy—before they, and the world, are trapped in a loop of ever-growing chaos.

Having not read the summary, I thought this was going to be about a contagious disease early on and I wondered what I’d stumbled into. Maybe the later half of a global pandemic wasn’t the best time for this? But the more we got into it and realized what FMS was and what was really going on, the more we were sucked in. The first half of the book is told from two view points, Helena and Barry. They’re not in the same place or in the same year but we quickly discovered how interlinked their stories would be. Crouch’s exploration of reality and what would realistically happen with new technology is really well done. I thought the reactions of many people were completely justified and Crouch’s ideas about the impact of a broken reality on the human psyche was great.

I adored Helena. She was so strong and brave and I respected her so much throughout this book. She was a great hero to be cheering for throughout. Her intelligence was forefront but usually understand which let her personality shine through. Barry seemed a little flat, but in a thriller I’m not usually looking for strong personalities in characters.

Helena was my favorite character. Her motivations, at least early on, were very noble and were always to help her mother. Her motivations changed to be for a greater good and she really expressed that when working for DARPA. She recognized ramifications and how what she was dealing with was so much larger than herself. She was a voice of reason and good when everything was going badly.

Barry was the most relatable character in the book. I’m sure most of us have something in our pasts that we wish we could fix or redo. Barry’s desires to have a different life were very understandable and I thought back to decisions in my own life that I might like a ‘do-over’ for.

Crouch

Blake Crouch Image via Goodreads

These next two paragraphs are going to be some major spoilers so please skip down to avoid them. I adored the time Helena spent working with DARPA. I thought it was really great how she fought to use the chair for good. She was backed against a wall but found the best way to make use of her position. Fighting to let major atrocities happen, pushing not to let large passages of time occur, these things made a difference. I was so sad when the project got hijacked by the military. It really seemed to ruin everything.

The ending was a bit anti-climactic for me. Slade telling Barry that Helena had found a way to travel to dead memories once and then Barry instantly figuring it out was a little too convenient. It was hard to believe that in 200 years, Helena had never tried visiting a dead memory again. Especially since she could jump back an hour and ‘fix’ the problem the same way Slide did with Reed on the oil rig. Such a simple solution to a very complex problem made the ending seem cheap.

Humans are starting to experience reality in different ways because of technology. We’ve developed virtual reality, online worlds that can fulfill social needs and desires. The idea that we may someday master time enough to change that aspect of our reality is jarring but not entirely out of the question. If we did get to this technology, what would we do with it? Would it be weaponized like Helena and Barry experienced? Would it be used for good the way Helena tried to do with her mother’s memories? It’s a hard question to answer. Humans do seem to be inclined to selfishly using every advancement our world has made so as much as we’d love to say it would be the latter, the former seems likely.

Writer’s Takeaway: Crouch put his foot on the throttle and never let it go. The pace in this book was astounding and kept me guessing and turning pages well past my bed time. Thriller writers have an amazing capacity to pace a book and I feel like I’m getting schooled each time I read one.

A great, fast, read that made me think. Four out of Five Stars

Until next time, write on.

You can follow me on GoodreadsFacebookTwitterPinterest, and Instagram. I’m available via email at SamAStevensWriter@gmail.com. And as always, feel free to leave a comment!

Some of the links on this post may be affiliate links. Taking on a World of Words is a participant in affiliate programs designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by linking to products. If you purchase a product or service through an affiliate link, your cost will be the same but Sam will automatically receive a small commission. Your support is greatly appreciated.

Related Posts: 
Recrusion, by Blake Crouch | A Bookish Type 
RECRUSION – Blake Crouch | Weighing a Pig Doesn’t Fatten It 
Recursion: book plot and timelines explained | Starvind 
Review: Recursion by Blake Crouch | Creature from the Book Lagoon 
Review of HARDBACK edition of Recrusion by Blake Crouch | Brainfluff 

Book Review: Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows by Balli Kaur Jaswal (4/5)

6 May

My husband saw the title for this book on my book club calendar and had to laugh at me. I can’t blame him. Out of context, the title seems odd. But when I started reading this book, I realize that the stories are a small part while they’re also the focus of the novel. It’s not about the stories, but the writers and how they change. This book took me happily by surprise.

PunjabiErotic Stories for Punjabi Widows by Balli Kaur Jaswal

Summary from Amazon:

Nikki lives in cosmopolitan West London, where she tends bar at the local pub. The daughter of Indian immigrants, she’s spent most of her twenty-odd years distancing herself from the traditional Sikh community of her childhood, preferring a more independent (that is, Western) life. When her father’s death leaves the family financially strapped, Nikki, a law school dropout, impulsively takes a job teaching a “creative writing” course at the community center in the beating heart of London’s close-knit Punjabi community.

Because of a miscommunication, the proper Sikh widows who show up are expecting to learn basic English literacy, not the art of short-story writing. When one of the widows finds a book of sexy stories in English and shares it with the class, Nikki realizes that beneath their white dupattas, her students have a wealth of fantasies and memories. Eager to liberate these modest women, she teaches them how to express their untold stories, unleashing creativity of the most unexpected—and exciting—kind.

As more women are drawn to the class, Nikki warns her students to keep their work secret from the Brotherhood, a group of highly conservative young men who have appointed themselves the community’s “moral police.” But when the widows’ gossip offers shocking insights into the death of a young wife—a modern woman like Nikki—and some of the class erotica is shared among friends, it sparks a scandal that threatens them all.

I did not expect there to be a mystery to this book and I loved it! That added a layer that was a complete surprise to me an allowed me to enjoy the book even more. What the book had to say about culture was really important, too. Nikki straddled her Punjabi roots and her London location better than some, but never seemed to completely fit in either location. Many times, it was comments from non-Punjabi’s who made her feel like she didn’t fit in and these microaggressions are so quick and might be forgettable to the errant speaker but are so painful to the victim. I thought Jaswal gave the reader a lot to think about with this book and I think I’ll seek her out for more in the future.

The characters rang true to me. I can’t comment too much about their authenticity since a lot of their identities circled around being part of a minority group that I’m not part of. However, I felt their humanity in their conversation and interactions. The community they had was wonderful and it made me hope that I can find such a community if I ever find myself a window.

Kulwinder ended up being my favorite character in the end. I think she may have been the most dynamic person in the book. The way her relationship with her husband heals was really great to see. I liked how she admitted that she misjudged Nikki and worked to right that mistake. She was brave in the way she stood up to her male coworkers and fought for woman’s classes. She didn’t seem to realize how much she’d influenced Maya with her ideas.

Nikki was really relatable as a daughter. There are times I’m afraid I’m disappointing my parents or have disappointed them in the past and I felt the same guilt that Nikki shared. I think most children feel this. Mine has never been to the same degree as what Nikki shouldered with her father’s death, but I think Jaswal gave a lot of different examples of ways that Nikki felt she could or should have done something different for her parents.

Jaswal

Balli Kaur Jaswal Image via the author’s Facebook page

I liked how Jaswal revealed Maya’s death. In some communities, there are things people just don’t talk about and it felt real that this community wouldn’t talk about Maya’s death. I liked how it kept coming up and we slowly learned more about her and her life with Jaggy and what she was like. It gave her a lot of layers and the more we got, the more obvious it was that something was wrong in what we’d learned early on. I won’t give any more away here, but it was very well paced.

I thought Nikki’s romance with Jason seemed forced. I don’t think she needed a romance to feel completed in this story so I was a little upset that it was added in. I think Nikki’s growth would have been as meaningful and stark without Jason in the mix.

The audiobook was narrated by Meera Syal and I think she did a wonderful job of telling the story. She did a great variety of voices for the widows and Nikki (I wasn’t a huge fan of her Jason American voice, but I can get over that). With so many woman talking over each other at times, it was a big task and I think she carried it out well.

Nikki is very stuck between two cultures and this story is a great exploration of that. She begins by rejecting a lot of the elements of her parents culture and trying to completely embrace her location’s culture. By the end, she seems to have found a happy middle ground where her understanding of her parents culture has increased and she feels more comfortable and accepted. She gains a level of understanding with her mother and sister that she wasn’t going to find without this acceptance and it’s helped her repair a stressed relationship with her late father in the process.

Writer’s Takeaway: This book reminds me why stories by minority writers are so needed and should be celebrated. I don’t live in the UK and I knew nothing about the Southall minority population! My city has similar enclaves and I now want to see if there are books celebrating their cultures and amplify those amazing voices. I’m so glad Jaswal wrote about this group so their vibrance can be shared.

An enjoyable read that taught me a lot. Four out of Five Stars.

Until next time, write on.

You can follow me on GoodreadsFacebookTwitterPinterest, and Instagram. I’m available via email at SamAStevensWriter@gmail.com. And as always, feel free to leave a comment!

Some of the links on this post may be affiliate links. Taking on a World of Words is a participant in affiliate programs designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by linking to products. If you purchase a product or service through an affiliate link, your cost will be the same but Sam will automatically receive a small commission. Your support is greatly appreciated.

Related Posts:
Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows: dazzling | A Hindu’s View 
Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows by Balli Kaur Jaswal | The Silver Pen 
Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows | Just One More Page 

WWW Wednesday, 5-May-2021

5 May

Welcome to WWW Wednesday! This meme was formerly hosted by MizB at A Daily Rhythm and revived here on Taking on a World of Words. Just answer the three questions below and leave a link to your post in the comments for others to look at. No blog? No problem! Just leave a comment with your responses. Please, take some time to visit the other participants and see what others are reading. So, let’s get to it!IMG_1384-0

The Three Ws are:

What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

Note: For users of Blogspot blogs, I’m unable to comment on your posts as a WordPress blogger unless you’ve enabled Name/URL comments. This is a known WordPress/Blogspot issue. Please consider enabling this to participate more fully in the community. 


LateralCurrently reading: I didn’t move through Lateral Thinking by Edward de Bono this week. I’m really not too worried about it, but I’m hoping I can return to it fairly soon and make some more progress!
I was able to get back to The Lady’s Guide to Petticoats and Piracy by Mackenzi Lee and I’m flying. I love the narrator for this one. While I’m not as enamored as I was with Lee’s first book, I’m still enjoying this and I think I can finish it within the week!
Reading Buddy and I are just about finished with Recursion by Blake Crouch. We met Monday and I’m now reading the last section so we can have our final meeting! Expect a review soon and this should easily be off here next week.
I’m reading The Hangman’s Replacement: Sprout of Disruption by Taona Dumisani Chiveneko between sections of the Crouch. I’m not too far yet and still unsure what to think of it. The style is very different but still enjoyable enough that I’ll keep going.

PunjabiRecently finished: I wrapped up Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows by Balli Kaur Jaswal as expected last week. I liked this one more than I expected from the title. It’s a very timely book about culture and understanding and I really liked what Jaswal had to say. I think it will be a good discussion with my book club. I was able to post my review yesterday if you want to read more. I gave the book Four out of Five Stars.

UndergroundReading next: I’m sold on Dollface by Renee Rosen being my next ebook. I just need to get to a point where I’m ready to start one!
I think I’ll need a new audiobook soon, too. Next up will be The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead. This was supposed to be a book club pick but got delayed due to COVID and seems to be permanently on hold. I’d still like to enjoy it and if we do eventually read it, I’ll be ahead of the curve.

Leave a comment with your link and comment (if you’re so inclined). Take a look at the other participant links in the comments and look at what others are reading.

Have any opinions on these choices?

Until next time, write on.

You can follow me on GoodreadsFacebookTwitterPinterest, and Instagram. I’m available via email at SamAStevensWriter@gmail.com. And as always, feel free to leave a comment!

Some of the links on this post may be affiliate links. Taking on a World of Words is a participant in affiliate programs designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by linking to products. If you purchase a product or service through an affiliate link, your cost will be the same but Sam will automatically receive a small commission. Your support is greatly appreciated.

Book Club Reflection: The Dutch House by Ann Patchett

4 May

One of my book clubs recently elected to read a book I read and enjoyed about a year ago, The Dutch House by Ann Patchett. I was delighted to talk more about this wonderful book. I’m usually a bit quieter during discussions of books I read so long ago, but as this was the first book my ready buddy and I discussed, I have a lot of recollection of the details of this book and was able to be a bigger part of the discussion.

The titular house has a lot of personality. It’s always described as a house, never a home to Danny or Maeve. The house seems very out of place in Pennsylvania. Some readers described it as a house in one of those village museums where houses are moved there and many rooms blocked off to stay frozen in time. Parts of it never advanced and it seemed odd that there were belongings of the previous owners. When Cyril and Elna moved in, they didn’t bring their own things. Andrea and her girls didn’t either. The house was a bit out of place in that it was made of stucco, like many houses in California, and had a clear passage from front to back like homes in the south before air conditioning.

Siblings with an age gap like Danny and Maeve sometimes feel like they grew up in different families because the people who raised them have changed so much in that time. Maeve never had kids of her own and since she had a mother and Danny did not, she was more of Danny’s mother. She grew up before her time and lost a lot of her childhood to raise Danny. Between Maeve, Jocelyn, Sandy, and Fluffy, Danny almost had a complete mother. We wondered if Elna felt she was leaving her children with a better mother figure in the staff than she could provide herself. Many of our readers wanted to learn more about Elna than what was in the book. They wanted to see how she grew up and how she could become someone who would abandon her children. Many felt that nothing about her was relatable. While Andrea was the complete opposite of her in many ways, her disruptive actions and spitefulness were just as hard to understand.

One reader described this as a glum book with a lot of unhappy people. Another said that there were a lot of fairy-tale-like elements to it. Andrea was a wicked stepmother, there was the expected missing parent in Elna as well. In many ways, Cyril must have felt like a knight in shining armor when he ‘rescued’ Elna from the convent before she took her vows. Maybe Elna didn’t want to be rescued.

It seems this group has picked another book I already ready for the next title so I’m excited to sit in and listen again. It’s fun to revisit old reads with a book club. Until next time, write on.

You can follow me on Goodreads, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram. I’m available via email at SamAStevensWriter@gmail.com. And as always, feel free to leave a comment!

Some of the links on this post may be affiliate links. Taking on a World of Words is a participant in affiliate programs designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by linking to products. If you purchase a product or service through an affiliate link, your cost will be the same but Sam will automatically receive a small commission. Your support is greatly appreciated.

Challenge Update, April 2021

3 May

Well, April wasn’t exactly the windfall I wanted, but it was better. I’m in a good place and if I can keep this pace going for the rest of the year, I’ll be fine. Not a strong possibility, but I can hope. You can look at my progress at any time on my challenge page.

Books finished in April:

Expecting Better by Emily Oster
The Overstory by Richard Powers
Mil veces hasta siempre (Turtles All The Way Down) by John Green
Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows by Balli Kaur Jaswal

This was a pretty good mix and I’m happy with that. Two print, two audio. I’ll be caught up on reviews by the end of the week, too, which is a great feeling. Overall, April has been pretty good for reading.

When Are You Reading? Challenge

6/12
Nothing new again which I’m still fine with. For being only 1/3 of the way through the year, having half the time periods finished is pretty great. I plan on starting a book to finish one more off soon. The earlier time periods can be a bit more of a challenge, but I feel up to it.

Goodreads Challenge

12/45
I’m still two books behind but feeling a bit better. I have a few books I’m close to finishing already in early May so May should be a steady reading month for me. One a week will get me through the end of the challenge. Let’s just hope Baby doesn’t mess that up too much. But I can’t count on anything with a baby coming, can I?

Book of the Month

mil veces

Cover image via Amazon

It’s a hard pick this month, but I’m going to go with Mil veces hasta siempre (Turtles All The Way Down) by John Green. I sped through this book and loved how the main character was portrayed. It was my favorite Green, but it was still a solid read.

Added to my TBR

It had to come eventually but I’ve added a few titles this month. I’m at 41 currently, which isn’t overwhelming and I’ll say I’m still happy with that length TBR versus where I’ve been.

  • How To Find Your Way in the Dark by Derek B. Miller. When one of your favorite authors drops a new title, it goes on our TBR. Seems pretty straight forward to me.
  • The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss. One of my new coworkers recommended this one and I’ve seen it around enough that I put it on my TBR. Sounds like a solid SciFi read and I haven’t had many of those lately so I’m game.
  • A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles. Strangely, Towles came up while reading Recursion and it got me thinking about how much I liked my first Towles read. I’ve convinced my reading buddy that we should read this one next so here it is on the TBR for a short time before we pick it up.

How are your challenges going? I hope your year is starting off well. If you’re interested in the When Are You Reading? Challenge for 2021, I’m hosting again so you can click here to learn more and let me know if you want in.

Until next time, write on.

You can follow me on GoodreadsFacebookTwitterPinterest, and Instagram. I’m available via email at SamAStevensWriter@gmail.com. And as always, feel free to leave a comment!

Some of the links on this post may be affiliate links. Taking on a World of Words is a participant in affiliate programs designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by linking to products. If you purchase a product or service through an affiliate link, your cost will be the same but Sam will automatically receive a small commission. Your support is greatly appreciated.