Archive | August, 2022

WWW Wednesday, 31-August-2022

31 Aug

Welcome to WWW Wednesday! This meme was formerly hosted by MizB at A Daily Rhythm and revived here on Taking on a World of Words. Just answer the three questions below and leave a link to your post in the comments for others to look at. No blog? No problem! Just leave a comment with your responses. Please, take some time to visit the other participants and see what others are reading. So, let’s get to it!

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The Three Ws are:

What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

Note: For users of Blogspot blogs, I’m unable to comment on your posts as a WordPress blogger unless you’ve enabled Name/URL comments. This is a known WordPress/Blogspot issue. Please consider enabling this to participate more fully in the community.


Currently reading: I haven’t touched Soldiers’ Pay by William Faulkner. Work was very difficult this week and I didn’t feel like starting a new habit of picking this up. It will be here for me when I’m ready, right?
I’ve been enjoying Vessel by Lisa A. Nichols. I had to commute one day which got me more listening time than I’m used to! It was a silver lining for me.
I made some OK progress in The 158-Pound Marriage by John Irving before I put it aside (see below). It’s funny when you read enough of an author that you can pick out the things they include most often. Even though this is an early novel by Irving, I still see those patterns.
My ILL for Hotel Iris by Yoko Ogawa came in! I picked it up right away and I’ve been trying to dedicate more time to it. I’ve done alright and I’m about half way through! I think this will be a quick read. It’s short and the chapters are a good length for me to read in a sitting or before bed. I’ll be optimistic and say this will be finished by next week.

Recently finished: Nothing new. BUT! I published my review of Rebeldes (The Outsiders) by S.E. Hinton on Monday. I love this book and gave it Five out of Five Stars. Please take a look if you have time!

Reading next: I’ll guess that I’ll need an audiobook next. Next up for me would be Like No Other by Una LaMarche. This was a free download through my library from 2020 so it seems as good a time as any to get around to it.

Leave a comment with your link and comment (if you’re so inclined). Take a look at the other participant links in the comments and look at what others are reading.

Have any opinions on these choices?

Until next time, write on.

You can follow me on Goodreads, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram. I’m available via email at SamAStevensWriter@gmail.com. And as always, feel free to leave a comment!

Some of the links on this post may be affiliate links. Taking on a World of Words is a participant in affiliate programs designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by linking to products. If you purchase a product or service through an affiliate link, your cost will be the same but Sam will automatically receive a small commission. Your support is greatly appreciated.

Book Review: Rebeldes (The Outsiders) by S.E. Hinton (5/5)

29 Aug

The Outsiders is one of my all time favorite novels. I never had to read it for school, but I picked it up on my own and I fell in love with Poneyboy, Soda, Darry, Dally, Johnny, Two-Bit, and everyone else. For Christmas last year, I asked my husband to get me a book in Spanish so I could do my annual Spanish read and he very thoughtfully got me a translation of my favorite greaser story.

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Cover image via Amazon

Rebeldes (The Outsiders) by S.E. Hinton

Other books by Hinton reviewed on this blog:

Hawkes Harbor
Some of Tim’s Stories

Summary from Amazon:

No one ever said life was easy. But Ponyboy is pretty sure that he’s got things figured out. He knows that he can count on his brothers, Darry and Sodapop. And he knows that he can count on his friends—true friends who would do anything for him, like Johnny and Two-Bit. But not on much else besides trouble with the Socs, a vicious gang of rich kids whose idea of a good time is beating up on “greasers” like Ponyboy. At least he knows what to expect—until the night someone takes things too far.

It’s probably been ten years since I read this book so I went in with a little bit of memory loss. I’ve also seen the movie more recently so that version was in the back of my head, too. I enjoy this story every time. There are a few defining moments that I anticipate and then I’m sad or excited when they happen, even when I know what’s coming. To me, this story is almost perfect. Revisiting it in a Spanish translation was so fun.

I love Hinton’s greasers and socs. She makes an effort to show that no one is one dimensional. Cherry and Randy have depth to them that Pony might not have guessed and we see the depth of the greaser characters. They seem a little simplistic because of the young first person narrator, but she’s created some wonderful characters in this book.

Dally is my favorite character, and I have to tribute some of that to Matt Dillon. I don’t know if I understood Dally’s character fully when I read the book the first time. The way Dillon plays him in the movie helped him jump off the page to me. He’s a much more complex character than I gave him credit for the first time. The ways he helps Johnny break my heart now that I recognize them better.

The fact that the characters are so relatable is part of what makes this story so amazing. I’m not a greaser or a soc and I’m not in high school any more, but I can empathize with a lot of what the gang was going through. I’ve had to see people beyond the way they look and how much money they have. I’ve been surprised by people for doing things I never should have doubted them capable of. Few things are black and white but we’re usually surprised at the number of shades of grey.

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S.E. Hinton Image via The Oakland Press

It may sound dark, but the time while Johnny is in the hospital is my favorite part of the book. The gang comes together and I find it very touching. There is a lot of raw emotion and these tough-looking boys have real feelings that are difficult for them to share. The Curtis boys come together in a beautiful way and show a lot of compassion for each other. I absolutely love it.

There isn’t much about this book I dislike. Hinton kept it brief so nothing stuck out to me as unnecessary or redundant. Every once in a while, there would be small details I kind of ignored, like how much the Curtis boys love eggs, but those didn’t distract from the story but they’re the only thing I can think of that I didn’t love.

Unconscious bias awareness is a huge part of how our society is evolving right now. We’ve become aware that there are things we don’t know or understand about how our brain works and they can affect people negatively. Once we’re aware of this and can act to mitigate it, we might be ready to start becoming a more just society. This isn’t a new concept and Hinton is exploring it in her novel. The greasers hate the socs for being socs and vice versa. They have to look past appearances and get beyond their differences to understand the humanity in the other group.

Writer’s Takeaway: Hinton was very young when she wrote this novel and it works in her favor. Her young voice is shared with Pony. Her phrasing and way of expressing things is in line with the young narrator we have. It shouldn’t be a detriment to a young writer that they’re young. She learned how to tell a story and share her feelings and experiences and it worked out wonderfully. We shouldn’t feel we need to hide our voices inside a character.

This book has stood the test of time for a reason. It’s absolutely wonderful. Five out of Five Stars.

This book fulfills the 1960-1979 time period of the When Are You Reading? Challenge.

Until next time, write on.

You can follow me on GoodreadsFacebookTwitterPinterest, and Instagram. I’m available via email at SamAStevensWriter@gmail.com. And as always, feel free to leave a comment!

Some of the links on this post may be affiliate links. Taking on a World of Words is a participant in affiliate programs designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by linking to products. If you purchase a product or service through an affiliate link, your cost will be the same but Sam will automatically receive a small commission. Your support is greatly appreciated.

Related Posts:
The Outsiders, S.E. Hinton | The Literary Flâneur
The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton | Fill Your Bookshelf
Book Review: The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton | JenJenReviews

WWW Wednesday, 24-August-2022

24 Aug

Welcome to WWW Wednesday! This meme was formerly hosted by MizB at A Daily Rhythm and revived here on Taking on a World of Words. Just answer the three questions below and leave a link to your post in the comments for others to look at. No blog? No problem! Just leave a comment with your responses. Please, take some time to visit the other participants and see what others are reading. So, let’s get to it!

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The Three Ws are:

What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

Note: For users of Blogspot blogs, I’m unable to comment on your posts as a WordPress blogger unless you’ve enabled Name/URL comments. This is a known WordPress/Blogspot issue. Please consider enabling this to participate more fully in the community.


Currently reading: I made some better progress in Soldiers’ Pay by William Faulkner this week. Nothing incredible, but I kept reminding myself to pick it up so I got through it. I’m enjoying it a bit more now so I’m going to stick with it and see where it gets me.
I started Vessel by Lisa A. Nichols and am enjoying it so far! It has an interesting premise and I can tell there’s a lot of mystery to it which I’m curious to see develop.
I had put in an ILL for my next physical book (see below) but it was too slow to come in so I’ve picked up The 158-Pound Marriage by John Irving. Irving is a perpetual favorite of mine so I’m excited to read one of his earlier works and see what I think of it.

Recently finished: I found a stride in Rebeldes (The Outsiders) by S.E. Hinton and wrapped it up on Friday. The ending grabbed me more than I thought. It’s quite different from the movie, which I’ve seen more recently than I reread it so I was intrigued because it felt like reading a new book for a minute. I’ll work on a review eventually but this one might be a while.
I wrapped up Dollface by Renée Rosen, too! I even found time to write and post a review. I impress myself. Please check it out. I gave the book Three out of Five Stars.

Reading next: I put in an ILL for Hotel Iris by Yoko Ogawa but it didn’t arrive before I wanted to start it. I’ll pick it up when it does come in, probably putting Irving on hold. It shouldn’t be too much longer, but I can’t figure out how to look up the status.

Leave a comment with your link and comment (if you’re so inclined). Take a look at the other participant links in the comments and look at what others are reading.

Have any opinions on these choices?

Until next time, write on.

You can follow me on Goodreads, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram. I’m available via email at SamAStevensWriter@gmail.com. And as always, feel free to leave a comment!

Some of the links on this post may be affiliate links. Taking on a World of Words is a participant in affiliate programs designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by linking to products. If you purchase a product or service through an affiliate link, your cost will be the same but Sam will automatically receive a small commission. Your support is greatly appreciated.

Book Review: Dollface by Renée Rosen (3/5)

22 Aug

When you have a manuscript for a 1920s novel, you read a lot of other 1920s novels. I had this one my list for a while and I picked up a copy years ago but never got around to reading it. I had Google Playstore credit that was going to expire so I bought a copy on audio. You get to it when you can, am I right?

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Cover Image via Amazon

Dollface by Renée Rosen

Summary from Amazon:

Vera Abramowitz is determined to leave her gritty childhood behind and live a more exciting life, one that her mother never dreamed of. Bobbing her hair and showing her knees, the lipsticked beauty dazzles, doing the Charleston in nightclubs and earning the nickname “Dollface.”

As the ultimate flapper, Vera captures the attention of two high rollers, a handsome nightclub owner and a sexy gambler. On their arms, she gains entrée into a world filled with bootleg bourbon, wailing jazz, and money to burn.  She thinks her biggest problem is choosing between them until the truth comes out. Her two lovers are really mobsters from rival gangs during Chicago’s infamous Beer Wars, a battle Al Capone refuses to lose.

The heady life she’s living is an illusion resting on a bedrock of crime and violence unlike anything the country has ever seen before. When the good times come to an end, Vera becomes entangled in everything from bootlegging to murder. And as men from both gangs fall around her, Vera must put together the pieces of her shattered life, as Chicago hurtles toward one of the most infamous days in its history, the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre.

This book felt to me like it contained just a little bit too much. There were elements that were there just to fit history in my mind, rather than adding to the story. I wished Evelyn’s character was simplified. I wished Basha and Dora were combined into one character. I wished there weren’t so many nick names for the gangsters. It felt like the story covered far too much time but it was also so compacted that I was surprised at how young Vera was in the end. It felt like Hannah’s age and antics at any age were just to fit the story and not really reflective of a child at that age. But here I’m complaining. Overall, I liked the story and liked Vera’s character. She seemed like a girl caught up in the whirlwind of being young and excited with just enough reality to bring her back down.

Vera was a fun character to follow. Her attitude reminded me of myself in my early 20s, but her daughter brought her closer to my current state of motherhood. I think she was caught up in glitz and glamor and realized very quickly how fast that could go away. She did seem rather weak willed at times, and that frustrated me in a heroine. In many ways, she was strong and independent, but then she’d do something silly for a man and I’d throw my hands up.

Shep was my favorite character to follow. I felt he was the most consistent throughout and we also had some fun little details of his personality that I loved. Putting his clothes under the mattress so he didn’t have to iron them was hilarious. I felt like he really loved Vera and I felt bad for him being two timed when she was with Tony. I kept wanting him to come back when he ‘went away’ because I felt like he always added something fun.

Some of Vera’s comments about motherhood hit me hard. I would find myself thinking “YASSS” when she mentioned feeding or sleep deprivation or just needing to get out for a minute. This is one of the first books I’ve read since my baby was born that had a new mother in it as well. It was refreshing and it helped me connect more with Vera.

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Renee Rosen Image via the author’s website

I liked the beginning and end of the book, but I felt like the middle had a lot of bits that could have been cut or trimmed. Vera’s relationships with Shep and Tony were fun to watch develop and the way that they wrapped up was a great rollercoaster. I enjoyed seeing the decisions Vera had to make and how she navigated them.

There were parts in the middle that seemed more like padding than story. Vera bootlegging, joining the Jewish Women’s group, and Evelyn’s relationship with Izzy were all, ultimately, not very influential in the overall plot and I think they could have been cut.

My audiobook was narrated by Rebekkah Ross. I thought she did well at giving Vera a voice. I could feel her pain and her joy at different times. Vera started the story very young and a bit naïve which I think Ross addressed well. As she experienced more loss, violence, and danger, her attitude changed and Ross developed this well.

Vera was living a dream until that dream crashed around her. She’d glamourized a lifestyle that many have idealized and longed for, ignoring the dirty sides of it. Gangsters are very iconic of the 1920s but many forget that their lives were accompanied by violence and danger. Being a Gangster Moll made you an icon, but it wasn’t sustainable. We often idealize a lifestyle of someone who is rich or famous. But those lives don’t last and they’re not always as happy as they might appear.

Writer’s Takeaway: It felt to me at times like Rosen was trying to hard to put historical events into her novel that she didn’t focus on the core story. Knowing that the story would end in the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre didn’t leave a lot of mystery about how it would all wrap up. If she’d been able to invent an event or had used imagined gangsters, it would have felt less predictable. I have to imagine she’d learned so much about these historical figures and wanted to include all she could. It’s something I’ve been really aware of in my 1920s novel as I edit it and want to make sure I’m focusing on the story more than the history.

Overall, I enjoyed the book, but it didn’t blow me away at all. Three out of Five Stars.

Until next time, write on.

You can follow me on GoodreadsFacebookTwitterPinterest, and Instagram. I’m available via email at SamAStevensWriter@gmail.com. And as always, feel free to leave a comment!

Some of the links on this post may be affiliate links. Taking on a World of Words is a participant in affiliate programs designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by linking to products. If you purchase a product or service through an affiliate link, your cost will be the same but Sam will automatically receive a small commission. Your support is greatly appreciated.

Related Posts:
Worth the Wait! Author Renee Rosen’s DOLLFACE Took a Ten Year Road to Publication | Women’s Fiction Writers
Mob Wives Chicago: Renee Rosen’s Dollface | Books on the Table

WWW Wednesday, 17-August-2022

17 Aug

Welcome to WWW Wednesday! This meme was formerly hosted by MizB at A Daily Rhythm and revived here on Taking on a World of Words. Just answer the three questions below and leave a link to your post in the comments for others to look at. No blog? No problem! Just leave a comment with your responses. Please, take some time to visit the other participants and see what others are reading. So, let’s get to it!

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The Three Ws are:

What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

Note: For users of Blogspot blogs, I’m unable to comment on your posts as a WordPress blogger unless you’ve enabled Name/URL comments. This is a known WordPress/Blogspot issue. Please consider enabling this to participate more fully in the community.


Currently reading: Not much in Rebeldes (The Outsiders) by S.E. Hinton again. We’re more set in our new routine, but I had a bit of a cold and didn’t want to read much before bed when I could close my eyes for a few extra minutes of rest.
I shold have Dollface by Renée Rosen
wrapped up by next week. I’m enjoying this one and I’ve been able to keep moving through audio at a good pace.
I
can tell I’m not enjoying Soldiers’ Pay by William Faulkner. I keep finding other things to do than read this when I could pick it up so it’s been slow going. I have this problem with ebooks often, where there are so many other things I could do on my phone that I don’t read. It’s caused me to drag out books I don’t enjoy as much for months and months.

Recently finished: Nothing this week but I should have something here soon!

Reading next: I’m looking forward to Vessel by Lisa A. Nichols. I should start it next week!

Leave a comment with your link and comment (if you’re so inclined). Take a look at the other participant links in the comments and look at what others are reading.

Have any opinions on these choices?

Until next time, write on.

You can follow me on Goodreads, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram. I’m available via email at SamAStevensWriter@gmail.com. And as always, feel free to leave a comment!

Some of the links on this post may be affiliate links. Taking on a World of Words is a participant in affiliate programs designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by linking to products. If you purchase a product or service through an affiliate link, your cost will be the same but Sam will automatically receive a small commission. Your support is greatly appreciated.

WWW Wednesday, 10-August-2022

10 Aug

Welcome to WWW Wednesday! This meme was formerly hosted by MizB at A Daily Rhythm and revived here on Taking on a World of Words. Just answer the three questions below and leave a link to your post in the comments for others to look at. No blog? No problem! Just leave a comment with your responses. Please, take some time to visit the other participants and see what others are reading. So, let’s get to it!

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The Three Ws are:

What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

Note: For users of Blogspot blogs, I’m unable to comment on your posts as a WordPress blogger unless you’ve enabled Name/URL comments. This is a known WordPress/Blogspot issue. Please consider enabling this to participate more fully in the community.


Currently reading: I didn’t make much progress in Rebeldes (The Outsiders) by S.E. Hinton this week. We’ve changed around Baby’s bedtime a bit and we’re still adjusting to the new flow of our evenings. I hope to get back into a groove of reading this soon.
I keep moving through Dollface by Renée Rosen
at a good pace. This will be the next one I finish, I’m just not sure how soon it will be.
I’ve only read the first chapter of Soldiers’ Pay by William Faulkner
so far. It’s a little more odd than I was expecting or remembered of Faulkner. This was his first publication so maybe that’s why it’s different from what I remember. Either way, it hasn’t captured my attention so I’m not rushing it.

Recently finished: Nothing new this week, unfortunately. I’d been flying through books so it’s odd to have finally slowed down. I hope I can get back into a rhythm soon.

I was able to post my review of Malorie by Josh Malerman on Monday! Please take a look if you care to. I enjoyed the book and read through it very fast! I gave it Four out of Five Stars.

Reading next: I still plan to pick up Vessel by Lisa A. Nichols on audio as soon as I need to.

Leave a comment with your link and comment (if you’re so inclined). Take a look at the other participant links in the comments and look at what others are reading.

Have any opinions on these choices?

Until next time, write on.

You can follow me on Goodreads, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram. I’m available via email at SamAStevensWriter@gmail.com. And as always, feel free to leave a comment!

Some of the links on this post may be affiliate links. Taking on a World of Words is a participant in affiliate programs designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by linking to products. If you purchase a product or service through an affiliate link, your cost will be the same but Sam will automatically receive a small commission. Your support is greatly appreciated.

Book Review: Malorie by Josh Malerman (4/5)

8 Aug

I made no secret of my love for Bird Box. Malerman is local to the Detroit area and I found a virtual event last year to hear him speak about his books and discovered that he was publishing a sequel, Malorie. I was pumped! I’ve made good progress in ebooks lately so I was excited to pick this one up and surprised myself with how fast I sped through it.

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Cover image via Amazon

Malorie (Bird Box #2) by Josh Malerman

Other books by Malerman reviewed on this blog:

Bird Box (and Book Club Reflection and Movie Review)
A House at the Bottom of a Lake

Summary from Amazon:

Twelve years after Malorie and her children rowed up the river to safety, a blindfold is still the only thing that stands between sanity and madness. One glimpse of the creatures that stalk the world will drive a person to unspeakable violence.

There remains no explanation. No solution.

All Malorie can do is survive – and impart her fierce will to do so on her children. Don’t get lazy, she tells them. Don’t take off your blindfold. And don’t look.

But then comes what feels like impossible news. And with it, the first time Malorie has allowed herself to hope.

Someone very dear to her, someone she believed dead, may be alive.

Malorie has already lost so much: her sister, a house full of people who meant everything, and any chance at an ordinary life. But getting her life back means returning to a world full of unknowable horrors – and risking the lives of her children again.

Because the creatures are not the only thing Malorie fears: There are the people who claim to have caught and experimented on the creatures. Murmerings of monstrous inventions and dangerous new ideas. And rumors that the creatures themselves have changed into something even more frightening.

Malorie has a harrowing choice to make: to live by the rules of survival that have served her so well, or to venture into the darkness and reach for hope once more.

It was so hard not to picture Sandra Bullock when reading this. She was an amazing Malorie in the movie. I felt like this story was very consistent with the first book. It takes place only a short time after the first book ends and pushes the characters into another tense situation. The world they were in was so dangerous that it was hard to think there was a happy ending to the first book. The characters had hope, but it was so fragile. I liked where this one went. I thought it was a realistic way for the world to develop. The division between those who were surviving, thriving, and rebelling was stark and felt real to me.

Reading this one as a mother, I can see why Malorie is as nervous and conservative as she is. The people who we see portrayed as rebels don’t have children from what we know. The burden of keeping another person alive has crushed Malorie into being a different person than she was before the Creatures showed up. She’s lost her identity because she can’t relax and get it back. Her survival mode instincts are strong.

I grew to love Olympia. She’s torn between her deep love for her mother and her connection with her brother. One wants to hold close and the other push away. The revelations about her at the end were heartbreaking and made her my favorite character. I was able to think back through the story and trace times that I could have figured out her secrets, but they were artfully subtle and made for a great reveal.

I related to Malorie’s protective nature over her kids. I would do anything for my Baby and I know who I’ve been since they were born is different than the person I was before. Having a Baby during COVID is different than Malorie’s situation, but I was able to draw some parallels in the precautions I had to take and my distrust of strangers who might inadvertently harm my baby. Mama Bear instincts are strong.

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Josh Malerman Image via Nelson Literary Agency

The train was an amazing part of the story. The details of how it got going were really fun and knowing Michigan geography as well as I do, I could picture it so easily. I loved the visual and the appeal of a blind train. It was so original and so fun to read.

Some spoilers here about my least favorite part so skip to the next paragraph to avoid those. I thought the ending was a bit too clean. Tom’s invention working right away and Malorie’s father being in Indian River seemed to clean up the story a little too fast. I felt it would be more realistic if the glasses didn’t work for everyone or they left and were able to find her father further on the rail line.

Parent-child relationships are complicated at best. In the world Malorie lives in, they’re insane. She’s had to sacrifice so much of herself to keep Tom and Olympia alive that she doesn’t recognize herself anymore. Tom is so resentful of how protective Malorie is that he doesn’t recognize the safety she provides. Now that I have a kiddo, I can see how they’ve changed me and how I’m not the version of myself I was when I got pregnant. I can also see their little personality flourishing and how, even now, they don’t want me being around and helping or keeping them safe when they want to explore and learn. And we don’t have creatures to worry about.

Writer’s Takeaway: I think Malerman was smart to revisit Malorie. It might seem like a cash grab, I know. I did listen to a talk he gave during the lockdown where he said he wrote this book because he couldn’t get Malorie out of his head and wanted to tell more of her story. Bird Box ended with a happier state than it began, but it was still not a goods state of the world. This book wrapped that up better, even if I did have some issues with it as stated above. I think he’d be hard pressed for a third book, but this second was a nice way of ending things.

An enjoyable read that I sped through. Four out of Five Stars.

This book fulfills the ‘Future’ time period of the When Are You Reading? Challenge.

Until next time, write on.When Are You Reading? 2022 Progress

You can follow me on GoodreadsFacebookTwitterPinterest, and Instagram. I’m available via email at SamAStevensWriter@gmail.com. And as always, feel free to leave a comment!

Some of the links on this post may be affiliate links. Taking on a World of Words is a participant in affiliate programs designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by linking to products. If you purchase a product or service through an affiliate link, your cost will be the same but Sam will automatically receive a small commission. Your support is greatly appreciated.

Related Posts:
Malorie by Josh Malerman | Bookworktopia
Malorie by Josh Malerman | Book Review | Callum McLaughlin
Review: Malorie by Josh Malerman | Obsessed with Fairy Tales
[REVIEW] Malorie- by Josh Malerman | Aiden Merchant
Malorie: A Review of the Bird Box Sequel | The Kate at Night

WWW Wednesday, 3-August-2022

3 Aug

Welcome to WWW Wednesday! This meme was formerly hosted by MizB at A Daily Rhythm and revived here on Taking on a World of Words. Just answer the three questions below and leave a link to your post in the comments for others to look at. No blog? No problem! Just leave a comment with your responses. Please, take some time to visit the other participants and see what others are reading. So, let’s get to it!

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The Three Ws are:

What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

Note: For users of Blogspot blogs, I’m unable to comment on your posts as a WordPress blogger unless you’ve enabled Name/URL comments. This is a known WordPress/Blogspot issue. Please consider enabling this to participate more fully in the community.


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Currently reading: I’m still moving forward in Rebeldes (The Outsiders) by S.E. Hinton though I’ve slowed down for sure. I know this story so well that I’m not motivated to find out what comes next which I think is keeping me from pushing forward as fast as I would with a new read.
I made some pretty good progress in Dollface by Renée Rosen. I’m about 3/4 done now so I’m hoping this one wraps up soon and I’ll get to a new audiobook shortly!
I started Soldiers’ Pay by William Faulkner as an ebook. I’m a little hesitant to dive into this one because I remember not being a huge fan of Faulkner in high school. Though I think knowing there was a project at the end deterred me from enjoying it. I’m not far in now and so far, it seems a little dense to be reading while the Baby is falling asleep, but we’ll see if that changes.

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Recently finished: I flew through Malorie by Josh Malerman much faster than I expected to! It was a thrilling pace and I enjoyed a lot about this book. Malerman has been knocking it out of the park for me this year and I’m loving that. I’m working on the review still. I gave it Four out of Five Stars

I was able to post my review of Shades of Magic: The Steel Prince by V.E. Schwab and illustrated by Andrea Olimpieri! I’m not great at reading and reviewing graphic novels so this was a bit of a challenge, but I still enjoyed it. I gave the series Three out of Five Stars.

Reading next: 
My next audiobook is going to be Vessel by Lisa A. Nichols. It’s been a bit since I’ve read anything in space so I’m looking forward to this one!

Leave a comment with your link and comment (if you’re so inclined). Take a look at the other participant links in the comments and look at what others are reading.

Have any opinions on these choices?

Until next time, write on.

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