Tag Archives: Edward McClelland

WWW Wednesday, 15-July-2020

15 Jul

Welcome to WWW Wednesday! This meme was formerly hosted by MizB at A Daily Rhythm and revived here on Taking on a World of Words. Just answer the three questions below and leave a link to your post in the comments for others to look at. No blog? No problem! Just leave a comment with your responses. Please, take some time to visit the other participants and see what others are reading. So, let’s get to it!IMG_1384-0

The Three Ws are:

What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

Note: For users of Blogspot blogs, I’m unable to comment on your posts as a WordPress blogger unless you’ve enabled Name/URL comments. This is a known WordPress/Blogspot issue. Please consider enabling this to participate more fully in the community. 


Currently reading: I made a little bit of progress through Chasing Water: Elegy of an Olympian by Anthony Ervin and Constantine Markides. I’m trying to be conscious about reading this a bit more. I enjoy it when I remember, but I often forgot to read it when I should.
My reading buddy and I met so I read our third section of The Glass Hotel by Emily St. John Mandel. We had a lot of predictions about what will happen in the back half of the book and I’m starting to see which of our guesses were right and which were a bit off. I’ll be excited to finish it soon!
I’m very early with In the Shadow of the Banyan by Vaddey Ratner. It feels so good to pull books off my shelf that have been sitting there for so long!
I also started a new audiobook, which I wasn’t sure I’d be able to do this week but I’m happy I could. I was able to find Before the Devil Breaks You by Libba Bray as an eaudiobook. My library had made it unavailable at one point but it seems it’s there again! I’m glad to be able to read this one and continue on with the series.

Recently finished: I finished up The Book Women of Troublesome Creek by Kim Michele Richardson after some long runs and drives. It wasn’t one I really enjoyed, but I didn’t dislike it either. I had some issues with the structure of the book, not the plot or characters. I wrote a review of it yesterday if you want to hear more. I gave the book Four out of Five Stars.
I finished off How to Speak Midwestern by Edward McClelland, as I expected. This book was a small let down as well, being more about regional vocabulary and food than it was about pronunciation and accents. Oh well. I still liked it and gave the book Four out of Five Stars. My review went up on Monday.

I posted my review of These Women by Ivy Pochoda on Thursday. Check it out if you want to hear more. This book got Three out of Five Stars from me.

Reading Next: Maybe I’m optimistic, but I think I need to pick out an ebook to read soon. I’m hoping to snag a copy of Dollface by Renee Rosen. I love 1920s flappers so this is right up my ally!


Leave a comment with your link and comment (if you’re so inclined). Take a look at the other participant links in the comments and look at what others are reading.

Have any opinions on these choices?

Until next time, write on.

You can follow me on GoodreadsFacebookTwitterPinterest, and Instagram. I’m available via email at SamAStevensWriter@gmail.com. And as always, feel free to leave a comment!

Some of the links on this post may be affiliate links. Taking on a World of Words is a participant in affiliate programs designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by linking to products. If you purchase a product or service through an affiliate link, your cost will be the same but Sam will automatically receive a small commission. Your support is greatly appreciated.

Book Review: How to Speak Midwestern by Edward McClelland (4/5)

13 Jul

One of my undergraduate degrees is in Spanish which involved quite a few classes on linguistics and phonology. And I loved it! I wish it was common to find a job in linguistics but without a PhD, it wasn’t practical. When I saw that my library was hosting Edward McClelland a few years ago, I was excited to hear him talk about accents throughout the Midwest where I’ve lived my entire life. I was curious to know: Do I have an accent? (Spoiler, yes)

Cover image via Amazon

How to Speak Midwestern by Edward McClelland

Summary from Amazon:

Pittsburgh toilet, squeaky cheese, city chicken, shampoo banana, and Chevy in the Hole are all phrases that are familiar to Midwesterners but sound foreign to anyone living outside the region. This book explains not only what Midwesterners say but also how and why they say it and covers such topics as: the causes of the Northern cities vowel shift, why the accents in Fargo miss the nasality that’s a hallmark of Minnesota speech, and why Chicagoans talk more like people from Buffalo than their next-door neighbors in Wisconsin. Readers from the Midwest will have a better understanding of why they talk the way they do, and readers who are not from the Midwest will know exactly what to say the next time someone ends a sentence with “eh?”.

This book wasn’t exactly what I was expecting. I was looking for a bit more when it came to pronunciation, which part of this book offered. The first half of it takes you through the three dialectal regions of the Midwest and talks about how vowel pronunciation shifted through the regions as they were populated by different immigrant groups. It talks about the effects of mass media, migration, and industrialization. However, half the book was a glossary of regional terms heard in different cities, states, and areas, that had nothing to do with pronunciation. A lot of it had to do with local cuisine. Granted, I laughed a lot and found it amusing, but it wasn’t what I was looking for in the book and it left me a little disappointed.

Edward McClelland
Image via Amazon

I was happy to be able to laugh at myself while reading this. I’m a life-long Michigander and reading about McClelland’s Yooper roommate (someone from Michigan’s Upper Penninsula, UP) and how the opposite of ‘Up North’ is ‘Down State’ had me giggling. I laughed even more at the mentions of Cincinnati, where a lot of my family lives. I had my husband realizing that my Grandma’s ‘funny’ habit of saying ‘Please?’ when she didn’t understand someone and wants them to repeat themself is due to the translation of the German word ‘bitte’ used in this context and the area’s heavy German population.

I was much more interested in the vowel shifts and movements of pronunciations around the Midwest than I was in the glossary. I studied regional dialects in Spanish and I was hoping for a bit more of a linguistic evaluation of the speech patterns, but I was still intrigued. It was interesting to hear how roadways and waterways played such a strong role in the development of regional speech

As I’ve said, the glossary was a bit of a disappointment. It was a lot longer than I was anticipating, over half the book. While it was amusing, I haven’t spent a long time in many of the areas covered or speaking with people from them so I didn’t really have an interest in any of the terms being explained to me.

Writer’s Takeaway: This book had a good mix of history, research, and personal stories. I liked when McClelland would introduce sentences he heard from people he met. His Yooper roommate, for example, saying “So, ah, I gotta take a shore and then I’ll be over to your hoase in about an oar, eh.” He recognizes in the Acknowledgements how many people he spoke to from these regions to nail down the glossary and hear examples of the different accents. I thought that was a great touch.

This book was enjoyable if not quite the researched phonetics book I was hoping for. Four out of Five Stars

Until next time, write on.

You can follow me on GoodreadsFacebookTwitterPinterest, and Instagram. I’m available via email at SamAStevensWriter@gmail.com. And as always, feel free to leave a comment!

Some of the links on this post may be affiliate links. Taking on a World of Words is a participant in affiliate programs designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by linking to products. If you purchase a product or service through an affiliate link, your cost will be the same but Sam will automatically receive a small commission. Your support is greatly appreciated.

Related Posts

WWW Wednesday, 8-July-2020

8 Jul

Welcome to WWW Wednesday! This meme was formerly hosted by MizB at A Daily Rhythm and revived here on Taking on a World of Words. Just answer the three questions below and leave a link to your post in the comments for others to look at. No blog? No problem! Just leave a comment with your responses. Please, take some time to visit the other participants and see what others are reading. So, let’s get to it!IMG_1384-0

The Three Ws are:

What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

Note: For users of Blogspot blogs, I’m unable to comment on your posts as a WordPress blogger unless you’ve enabled Name/URL comments. This is a known WordPress/Blogspot issue. Please consider enabling this to participate more fully in the community. 


Currently reading: I haven’t been doing great with Chasing Water: Elegy of an Olympian by Anthony Ervin and Constantine Markides but I’m still moving through it. I’m at the point where Tony is starting to swim again which helps keep my interest so I hope I’ll be back into it soon.
I got to the end of the section my buddy and I are reading in The Glass Hotel by Emily St. John Mandel. So I’m paused with this one until she catches up and we can talk again. I’m loving this book so I’m really looking forward to it.
I started two new books and I stuck to my reading plan! I started the audiobook of The Book Women of Troublesome Creek by Kim Michele Richardson. I knew nothing about this one before I started so it’s been a bit confusing getting into it and learning about Cussy. I don’t think this one will take too long so I should be through it in a week or two.
I also started my physical copy of How to Speak Midwestern by Edward McClelland which has been such fun. I have family from a lot of different regions of the Midwest and I’ve lived in two dialectal regions so I can pick out the differences he’s talking about in the people I know.

Recently finished: I was able to finish These Women by Ivy Pochoda on Wednesday like I thought. I’m still trying to wrap my head around it completely because I think I was supposed to get a little more out of it than I did. I’ll have a review up tomorrow; maybe that will help me sort through how I felt about it.

Reading Next: Since Midwestern is so short, I’ll probably need a physical book next. I want to keep pushing forward with my shelf so I’ll probably pick up In the Shadow of the Banyan by Vaddey Ratner. I’ve had this on my TBR for ages since I picked it up used at a library sale. I love knocking down these books that have been there for ages!


Leave a comment with your link and comment (if you’re so inclined). Take a look at the other participant links in the comments and look at what others are reading.

Have any opinions on these choices?

Until next time, write on.

You can follow me on GoodreadsFacebookTwitterPinterest, and Instagram. I’m available via email at SamAStevensWriter@gmail.com. And as always, feel free to leave a comment!

Some of the links on this post may be affiliate links. Taking on a World of Words is a participant in affiliate programs designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by linking to products. If you purchase a product or service through an affiliate link, your cost will be the same but Sam will automatically receive a small commission. Your support is greatly appreciated.

WWW Wednesday, 1-July-2020

1 Jul

Welcome to WWW Wednesday! This meme was formerly hosted by MizB at A Daily Rhythm and revived here on Taking on a World of Words. Just answer the three questions below and leave a link to your post in the comments for others to look at. No blog? No problem! Just leave a comment with your responses. Please, take some time to visit the other participants and see what others are reading. So, let’s get to it!IMG_1384-0

The Three Ws are:

What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

Note: For users of Blogspot blogs, I’m unable to comment on your posts as a WordPress blogger unless you’ve enabled Name/URL comments. This is a known WordPress/Blogspot issue. Please consider enabling this to participate more fully in the community. 


Currently reading: One chapter a day of Chasing Water: Elegy of an Olympian by Anthony Ervin and Constantine Markides is still my goal but it’s not happening as I planned. I’m getting about two a week, so I’m still moving through just a bit slower. The narrative is covering Ervin’s return to the sport and I’m enjoying this journey a lot.
I’m back to reading The Glass Hotel by Emily St. John Mandel. My buddy and discussed Part 1 and we’re on to Part 2. I’ll probably zip through this soon so we can meet and talk again. I’m really loving Mandel’s plot here.
I’ll probably wrap up These Women by Ivy Pochoda today, I’m so close to finishing it! This is a really dark book but I’m making a lot of connections to current cultural issues and it’s been fascinating to hear the stories from the women who are so often overlooked.

Recently finished: I stayed up way too late Saturday night to finish The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes by Suzanne Collins. My swim the next morning was a bit of a struggle. I enjoyed it well enough, but I wasn’t a huge fan of the ending and it left a bit of a sour taste in my mouth. I’m glad I read it, but I probably won’t reread it any time soon. I posted my review yesterday if you want to read more of my thoughts. I gave the book Four out of Five Stars.

Reading Next: I’ll grab my copy of How to Speak Midwestern by Edward McClelland as soon as I finish the second section of Mandel. It shouldn’t take more than a day or two.
I’ll start another book club pick on audio soon. We’re reading The Book Women of Troublesome Creek by Kim Michele Richardson. I don’t know anything about this one but I’ve felt that books about books haven’t been going well for me lately so I’m a bit weary. Fingers crossed.


Leave a comment with your link and comment (if you’re so inclined). Take a look at the other participant links in the comments and look at what others are reading.

Have any opinions on these choices?

Until next time, write on.

You can follow me on GoodreadsFacebookTwitterPinterest, and Instagram. I’m available via email at SamAStevensWriter@gmail.com. And as always, feel free to leave a comment!

Some of the links on this post may be affiliate links. Taking on a World of Words is a participant in affiliate programs designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by linking to products. If you purchase a product or service through an affiliate link, your cost will be the same but Sam will automatically receive a small commission. Your support is greatly appreciated.

WWW Wednesday, 24-June-2020

24 Jun

Welcome to WWW Wednesday! This meme was formerly hosted by MizB at A Daily Rhythm and revived here on Taking on a World of Words. Just answer the three questions below and leave a link to your post in the comments for others to look at. No blog? No problem! Just leave a comment with your responses. Please, take some time to visit the other participants and see what others are reading. So, let’s get to it!IMG_1384-0

The Three Ws are:

What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

Note: For users of Blogspot blogs, I’m unable to comment on your posts as a WordPress blogger unless you’ve enabled Name/URL comments. This is a known WordPress/Blogspot issue. Please consider enabling this to participate more fully in the community. 


Currently reading: I keep trying to read one chapter of Chasing Water: Elegy of an Olympian by Anthony Ervin and Constantine Markides every day but I’m often failing. I’m still reading some, though, so I’ll continue moving through this one. I’m over halfway so far but this will probably be here another few weeks.
My buddy and I are meeting to talk about the first section of The Glass Hotel by Emily St. John Mandel tomorrow. I sped through Part I and I’m looking forward to moving deeper into it. There’s a lot to unpack with these characters and I think we’ll have a lot to talk about with the book, too.
I started The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes by Suzanne Collins! Finally. I want to rewatch the movies for the original trilogy now. I’m not sure I have the time to re-read them. And Jennifer Lawrence does such a great job that the movies are a joy. This might move off of here quickly, I’m picking it up at every opportunity.
I started a new audiobook for my book club. We’re reading These Women by Ivy Pochoda. I’m not sure what to expect from this one. All I know is that it’s a mystery and I’m in the mood for one right now, so bring it on!

Recently finished: I sped through Semper Fidelis by Ruth Downie and wrapped it up Saturday morning. I posted my review yesterday so you can see my full thoughts there. This one wasn’t my favorite of the series, but I liked it and will continue reading the series. It looks like there are currently eight so I still have some time before I catch up. I gave the book Four out of Five Stars.

I posted my review of Fiction Writer’s Workshop by Josip Novakovich last Thursday. This book was very mediocre for me. There were a few helpful nuggets, but for the most part it fell a bit flat in my eyes. I gave it Three out of Five Stars.

Reading Next: I think it will be time for a little non-fiction soon. I have a signed copy of How to Speak Midwestern by Edward McClelland on my shelf and I’m probably running out of quarantine time to get through my signed books. I heard McClelland speak at the library a few years ago. My language degree got me really interested in dialect and this seems like a fascinating look at my own accent and dialect. I’m excited to dig in.


Leave a comment with your link and comment (if you’re so inclined). Take a look at the other participant links in the comments and look at what others are reading.

Have any opinions on these choices?

Until next time, write on.

You can follow me on GoodreadsFacebookTwitterPinterest, and Instagram. I’m available via email at SamAStevensWriter@gmail.com. And as always, feel free to leave a comment!

Some of the links on this post may be affiliate links. Taking on a World of Words is a participant in affiliate programs designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by linking to products. If you purchase a product or service through an affiliate link, your cost will be the same but Sam will automatically receive a small commission. Your support is greatly appreciated.

Meeting Author Edward McClelland

26 Jun

In college, my phonetic Spanish classes were my favorite. I thought it was really fascinating to study accent and the way people pronounce words. When I heard about a speech going on at my library about the Midwestern American accent, I knew it would be something I’d enjoy. Edward McClelland is from Lansing Michigan and went to Michigan State University located there. He’s gone on to journalism in Chicago.

McClelland talked about the vowel shift happening in the Inland North region, the area Michigan is located in. There’s ‘A Raising’ where the word ‘can’ sounds more like ‘caen.’ There’s a ‘Fronted O’ where the word ‘box’ sounds like ‘bahhx.’ Then there’s the ‘Short E/U Confusion’ where ‘seven’ sounds like ‘suvun.’ When I was living in Southern Indiana, part of the Midland accent region, I was told I had an accent though I really don’t hear it! They said it was how I pronounced my vowels and now I might see where it’s coming from. Here’s a fun one: I pronounce the words cot and caught the same. Do you?

The North Eastern accent slowly moved inland and spread to the Midwest and Michigan. What I think of as a ‘Boston Accent’ with dropped Rs actually was brought over from the UK but never made it to the Midwest which is why we have a distinction there. Midwesterners think they don’t have an accent because broadcasters on television and actors on TV tend to speak like they’re from the Midwest. This accent is actually based on how people spoke in Ohio in the 1920s.

One of the most interesting things to me was how McClelland described Yoopanese. For those unfamiliar with Michigan, the state is split into two separate peninsulas. For a long time, there was no bridge between the two and to get across the straits of Mackinaw, you had to drive around Lake Michigan through Wisconsin and Illinois. I live in the lower peninsula (LP) and am called a Troll because I live below the bridge. I call someone from the Upper Peninsula (UP) a Yooper (UP-er). Yoopanese has a strong influence from Finnish because of a large number of Finnish immigrants who came to work in lumber and mining in that region.

Some traits of the Yooper accent include d/th slurring (the/de), cot/caught distinction, and the word ‘eh’ as an interjection. This is usually a Canadian stereotype but if you see on a map how close the UP is to Canada, it’s no surprise it spilled over! Getting to Canada was much easier than getting to the LP.

Finally, McClelland talked about words that have different meanings in Michigan or different things that exist in Michigan. So, let’s see if you can speak my dialect of Midwestern. What are these? Definitions are in McClelland’s book, How To Speak Midwestern (but I’ll tell you if you as in the comments).

  • Michigan Left
  • Coney Dog
  • Party Store
  • Fudgie

Good luck! I hope someone out there is as big of a language nerd as me.

Until next time, write on.

You can follow me on Goodreads, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram. I’m available via email at SamAStevensWriter@gmail.com. And as always, feel free to leave a comment!